Perlan

“The Pearl” is built on top of the hot-water storage tanks, in the outdoor area Öskjuhlíð. The space-ship-like building is very interesting from the architectural point of view with the dome of the Pearl consisting of reflecting glass panels on hollow steel frames. The restaurant rotates a full circle in 2 hours and affords a splendid view over the city, bay and surroundings. The Pearl is a first-class restaurant, famous for it’s superb cuisine. The chefs of the restaurant have won several awards worldwide.

Restaurant Perlan - dining room     Restaurant Perlan - the dome     Restaurant Perlan - the stairs

Some more information

The Pearl is a magnificent structure. Formally opened to the public on 21 June 1991, it combines utility and vision. Hollow steel framing supports the glass dome and walls that link six aluminum-sided tanks, each of which can contain 4 million liters of water averaging 85°C (185°F). As part of The Pearl’s heating system, hot water is pumped through the metal framework in winter, while cold water flows during summer, thereby producing a comfortable year-round environment.

The acoustic challenge posed by the vast open interior of The Pearl was met through specific application of technology and material by Hljod, whose resulting sound design was awarded the prestigious GOLDEN EAR for 1993. Whether vocal or instrumental, Hljods outstanding success affords visitors to The Pearl the best in sound from The Winter Garden to the top of the dome.

The height of the structure is 25.7 metres (84.3 feet). The volume is 20,000 cubic metres (706,300 cubic feet). Total floor space is 3,700 square metres (39,827 square feet). Total floor space of the Winter Garden is 1,000 square metres (10,764 square feet). There are 1,176 window panes. 58 floodlights illuminate the exterior. 105 pole lights illuminate the grounds. Fluorescent lights light up the Viewing Deck. 1,900 lights illuminate the interior. 942 bulbs create the “star heaven” inside the dome. 12 km (7.5 miles) of electric cable and 37 km (23 miles) of sound system cable run through the building.